Surgical Procedures

Here at MDPC, we specialise in Ophthalmology, Oral Maxillofacial, General and Endoscopic procedures , including the ground breaking new Laser Assisted Cataract Surgery.

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Ophthalmology

Cataract Surgery

Cataracts develop as a normal part of the aging process. By the age 60 about half of all adults will have some cataract formation, although it may be minor and unnoticeable. By the age 70, nearly everyone has some degree of cataract formation. The term ‘cataract’ refers to cloudy or opaque areas in part or all areas of the lens which interfere with the passage of light through the lens. The clouding of the lens leads to a reduction in vision, glare and other symptoms.

Removal of a cataract is one of the most common procedures performed in Australia, and throughout the world. The surgical goal is to restore visual function through a safe and minimally invasive procedure. The procedure involves replacement of the cloudy lens with an artificial lens implant (an intraocular lens otherwise known as an ‘IOL’). The operation is performed under a microscope through a tiny incision.

The operation permanently removes the cataract and insertion of the artificial lens may reduce dependence on spectacles.

Cataract surgery is usually performed using local anaesthetic and light sedation. In Australia a specialist anaesthetist administers the anaesthetic and sedation.

For some patients, general anaesthesia may be recommended.

RECOVERY AFTER SURGERY
When the effects of the sedation has worn off and you have had something to eat and drink, you will be able to go home with an escort.

A follow-up visit to your doctor will have been arranged before you leave.

Introducing – LenSx – Laser Assisted Cataract Surgery

Here at MDPC we are extremely proud to now be one of  a growing number of medical facilities in the world to offer this ground-breaking new technology in cataract surgery. Using the latest laser technology, patients now have the option of choosing a bladeless, computer-controlled LenSX laser to perform the first 3 critical steps to cataract surgery.

The LenSX laser creates precise incisions in the eye, creates a perfectly sized opening in the front of the lens and divides the cataract, all with the high precision image guided femtosecond laser.

This prepares the eye successfully for the subsequent cataract surgery steps and IOL insertion.

The LenSX laser is an advanced precision based technology that uses a computer controlled and image guided high frequency femtosecond laser to perform the early stages of the cataract procedure, cutting the tissues with a high degree of precision. Femtosecond laser technology (where making the incision takes the tiniest fraction of a second) has already been well proven over the last 10 years in Refractive Laser Eye Surgery.

The LenSX Femtosecond Laser is based on this technology and is the first available in Australia.

What are the advantages of LenSX Laser Assisted Cataract Surgery?

  • A bladeless procedure
  • More precise incisions. It is felt this will create more reproducible results with regard to astigmatism allowing better visual results. The incision is also theoretically more robust and hence safer.
  • A perfectly shaped and centred lens opening possibly leading to more accurate IOL positioning and better visual results.

A gentler procedure due to less manipulation to the eye. Laser-assisted cataract surgery has the potential to reduce the energy, fluid and the time used during cataract surgery therefore ensuring a faster, kinder and gentler approach leading to quicker visual recovery and less damage to the delicate structures inside the eye.

Click here to download the LenSx brochure to learn more
Surgery at MDPC
Click here to read more about LenSx laser

Corneal Graft Surgery

Abnormalities of the cornea include keratoconus, corneal dystrophy, corneal scarring and chemical burns. These abnormalities may be rectified by the replacement of the cornea.

After thorough examination an ophthalmologist will determine if an individual could benefit or is ready for a corneal transplant. The timing of the transplant operation will depend on the availability of donor tissue from the Lions Corneal Donation Services.

Corneal transplant procedures are usually performed under local anaesthesia which is administered by the Anaesthetist.

Corneal transplantation or (corneal grafting) is performed using a microscope. The patients diseased cornea is removed using a cylindrical cutting instrument. The donor cornea is cut similarly so that the shapes are identical. The healthy donor cornea is placed in the opening where the patient’s diseased cornea was removed and then sewn into place, using sutures less the thickness of human hair.

RECOVERY AFTER SURGERY
When the effects of the anaesthetic have worn off and you have had something to eat and drink you will be able to go home with an escort.

A follow-up visit to your doctor will have been arranged before you leave.

Pterygium

A Pterygium is an abnormal wedge-shaped growth on the white of the eye which encroaches onto the clear cornea. Pterygia are thought to be caused to a large extent by sun exposure; it is therefore recommended that people who are regularly exposed to bright sunlight should protect their eyes by wearing hats and sunglasses. Pterygia can cause significant discomfort and redness and may need to be removed surgically.

ANAESTHESIA
Again the surgery is almost always performed under local anaesthetic and light sedation without causing discomfort. A Conjuctival Transplant (the transpondent skin that covers the white of the eye) is often performed to reduce the risk of a reoccurrence of the Pterygium.

RECOVERY AFTER SURGERY
When the effects of the sedation have worn off and you have had something to eat and drink you will be able to go home with an escort.

A follow up visit to your doctor will have been arranged before you leave.

Trabeculectomy

A Trabeculectomy is a common surgical treatment for Glaucoma.

Glaucoma is the name given to a group of eye diseases often associated with increased pressure inside one or both eyes. Excessive pressure may damage the optic nerve and Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss in people over 40 but can affect people of any age. If glaucoma is detected early, treatment can prevent or minimise loss of vision in most patients.

The most common surgical procedure to treat glaucoma is called a filtering procedure or ‘trabeculectomy’. In this procedure the ophthalmic surgeon creates a channel into the surrounding tissues through the wall of the eye (the sclera) near the trabecular meshwork. This lets the fluid slowly drain out of the eye and so reduces the pressure. A drug to prevent the channel closing may be used.

ANAESTHESIA
Trabeculectomy is usually performed under local anaesthesia with light sedation administered by a specialist anaesthetist.

RECOVERY AFTER SURGERY
When the effects of the sedation have worn off and you have had something to eat and drink, you will be able to go home with an escort.

A follow up visit to your doctor will have been arranged before you leave

D.C.R. – Dacrycystorhinostomy

A D.C.R. is an operation to open a blocked tear duct to allow for drainage of tears directly into the nose.

Endoscopic D.C.R.

Blocking of the tear canal may result from obstructions arising anywhere from the small tear duct in the lower eyelid to the nasolacrimal duct where it drains into the nose.

Performing this procedure endoscopically involves the use of a fine telescope with a camera attached. The telescope is passed up the nostril and the surgeon views the operative site on a monitor. A light pipe is passed down the tear duct to the lacrimal sac providing a clear view of the area. An opening, approximately 8-10mm in size, is made in the wall of the nose and a union is created between the mucosal lining of the nose in this area and the lacrimal sac. A silicone tube is put in place to ensure that the passage remains open.

This procedure is minimally invasive, with no noticeable wound.

ANEASTHESIA
A general anaesthetic administered by a specialist anaesthetist is required for this procedure.

RECOVERY AFTER SURGERY
You will rest on a trolley until you are awake and ready to get dressed. You will move to a recliner chair where you will be offered something to eat and drink. When you are deemed fully awake and alert you will be able to go home with an escort.

A follow up visit to your doctor will be arranged before you leave.

Dental

Wisdom Teeth

Wisdom teeth, or third molars, are the last teeth to emerge in the mouth. These four molars appear during late teens or early twenties, when a person is physically mature, hence the name “wisdom teeth’. It is common for the wisdom teeth to not rise above the gum line and become impacted in the jaw. The wisdom teeth may need to be removed if impaction occurs or if they are a threat to other teeth.

Wisdom teeth can be removed under local anaesthesia in the dentist’s office. However, if the tooth is deeply impacted or is expected to be hard to extract the dentist may refer the person to an oral surgeon for tooth removal.

ANAESTHESIA
Removal of wisdom teeth usually is performed under general anaesthesia.

Surgery requires the gum tissue that covers the tooth to be removed, gently detaching the connective tissue between the tooth and the bone, removing the tooth and then suturing is needed to close the open gum-line.

RECOVERY AFTER SURGERY
Ice packs will be placed on you cheeks to reduce post-operative swelling. You will rest on a trolley until you are sufficiently awake and ready to get dressed. You will then move to a recliner chair and have something to eat and drink. When you are ready you will be able to go home.

A follow up visit with your doctor will have been arranged before you leave.

Dental Implants

Dental implants are an artificial tooth or bridge that are attached to the jawbone. They can replace one or more teeth, provide support for partial dentures, or are used to attach full dentures. An implant is to be treated as a natural tooth and can be expected to last for a decade or more.

Endoscopy

Colonoscopy

A colonoscopy is a minimally invasive procedure performed under general anaesthesia and patients can expect to be with us for approximately 3 hours from start to finish. It is a procedure in which a physician visually examines a patient’s colon and, if necessary, removes cells for biopsy. A colonoscopy may be arranged if a patient is experiencing gastrointestinal problems or symptoms. Additionally, many physicians recommend an annual colonoscopy for patients over 50 as a screening for colorectal cancer.

The procedure itself involves a special scope, which is run through the rectum and into the colon, or large intestine. The images picked up by the scope are transmitted to a screen, allowing the physician to detect any abnormalities indicating a disease or disorder. Common problems detected by colonoscopy include irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease, or ulcerative colitis.

The patient must prepare for a colonoscopy by following a specific set of directions provided by their physician in advance. Preparation for a colonoscopy involves cleaning out the intestines in order to optimize viewing. Most patients are advised to follow a clear liquid diet for 24 hours prior to their scheduled procedure and required to take a form of laxative in scheduled doses. We strongly emphasize following preparation instructions carefully, because failure to do so can cause results to be inaccurate or the entire procedure to be unsuccessful.

ANEASTHESIA
A general anaesthetic administered by a specialist anaesthetist is required for this procedure.

RECOVERY AFTER SURGERY
You will rest on a trolley until you are awake and ready to get dressed. You will move to a recliner chair where you will be offered something to eat and drink. When you are deemed fully awake and alert you will be able to speak with your Doctor about any findings during the procedure and following this, you will then be discharged to go home with an escort.

Gastroscopy

A Gastroscopy is a medical procedure where a camera is inserted into the patient’s mouth and fed down the throat to inspect the esophagus and stomach. This is a minimally invasive procedure and may also be known as an “endoscopy”, a term used generally to refer to any procedure involving the use of a camera to visualize the inside of the body. It is performed for the diagnostic testing and evaluation of patients. The procedure takes approximately 3 hours from start to finish and patients should plan on setting aside at least half a day for a gastroscopy if one is recommended.

During a Gastroscopy, the endoscope is inserted and gas may be pushed into the stomach to make it easier to see. As the camera is advanced, the physician will take note of any abnormalities encountered, and the results of the medical imaging study can be recorded for future reference as well. Once the doctor has gotten a good look, the camera will be removed and the patient will be allowed to recover.

ANEASTHESIA
A general anaesthetic administered by a specialist anaesthetist is required for this procedure.

RECOVERY AFTER SURGERY
You will rest on a trolley until you are awake and ready to get dressed. You will move to a recliner chair where you will be offered something to eat and drink. When you are deemed fully awake and alert you will be able to speak with your Doctor about any findings during the procedure and following this, you will then be discharged to go home with an escort.